to lock or not to lock #2 | Debbie's Caribbean Resort Reviews Forums

It is great to read comments but lets do a poll on this topic …Who does or does not secure their luggage whenthey travel to Cuba and how
I secure my cases with locks.I have a set of 4 locks with the same master key.

Freedom Ryder 8-)………..

busman7 Guest

Don’t lock at least they don’t have to damage your luggage if they want some in.

Use locks but supposedly they are ones that can be opened by customs. There is a code on them that tells them which master key I think.

We always use the little padlocks on ours – makes it a bit harder for any chancer wanting to rifle through the bags.

I don’t lock I’ve had them cut off. As I mentioned previously, I’ve had themcut off by homeland security, so I dont carry anything of value in my bags and no longer lock them.The best lock is only a deterrent(challenge)…

and locks only keep honest people honest

We do not lock our luggage. Good or bad thing? I don’t know. Some of our luggage was lost (delayed) this year. It ended up in Havana (we were at Holguin). Suitcases had been rifled through with some items stolen. (Camera battery charger, which really sucked, a 1gig memory chip and a roll of electrician’s tape. (Why did I have electrician’s tape? Don’t ask.))

I voted "other". Plastic cable ties holding zipper ends together and 2 luggage straps around each duffel. If someone wants into our bags, they are going to have to make an effort. As for customs, they don’t have to break any locks and it’s easy to pack along replacement ties. In our 30 years of travelling out of the country we have never had our bags interferred with (knock on wood). We never put anything of value in checked luggage; valuables go in our carry ons.

I use tie wraps that come with garbage bags. I use them just to stop the zippers opening. We also had a scuba bag ‘lost’. It eventually arrived in Havana and then came by taxi to our hotel. Nothing was touched. We also had a bag left in Varadero, it was delivered to our home, again, nothing touched.

S.

I have never locked our bags. There is never anything of value in them. Anything of value is in our carry on.

I have aways locked my luggage and had never had a problem with them being cut off. I do take extra ones just in case. I would rather be safe than sorry. Last year my sons girlfriend came with us her first time to the Caribbean I had asked her if she was going to lock her luggage and she said no. When we finally made it to our resort she found she had her a carton of cigarettes taken :(. She know locks her luggage and takes a spare just in case.. You just never know…..

Nope, no locks. This trip mine and my sons bags were rifled through both directions. Nothing missing, nothing damaged. Can’t help thinking that if they were locked they would have been broken into, we would have been called to open them, or some other thing. Nothing to hide, nothing we would be sad about losing… no locks, no hassles.

Unless you have a hard sided, no zipper suitcase there’s no point in locking it. The soft sided case with a lock is easy to get into. You can’t tell someone broke into it until you get home/into your room and find out your missing things. Been there at both ends(??????)

martian Guest I always lock with zip-ties. Not to protect anything – like everyone else, all my valuables are in my carry on – but I do like to know if anyone was inside my luggage.

I arrived from Colombia a few years ago and my zip-tie on a small side pocket had been cut off. I alerted security before touching the bag and the drug dog went insane. Security took possession of the bag and checked it out, eventually finding nothing, but still… I was glad they did their job before I innocently walked by the drug dog on the way to the exit…

We’ve never locked our bags, but we routinely have things stolen. Most recently my brother-in-law had an expensive bottle of cologne stolen from his checked luggage. It was slightly over the 100 ml mark so it couldn’t be taken in his carry-on. Had I known he was planning to bring it, I would have suggested that he leave it at home. But being 16 years old, I’m sure he would have ignored me and felt it was necessary for any potential hook-ups with the ladies.I’m not sure how much a lock would actually discourage a determined Cuban. But I do like Martian’s thinking on this… about wanting to know if someone’s been through my luggage. Maybe I’ll try those zip-ties on our next trip.

When packing to come home again, I’m usually somewhat disgruntled about whatever went missing on the way down. (It’s never anything overly valuable, but I never like being a victim.) So I always make sure to put my dirty underwear and socks right on top. A special treat for anyone curious enough to open my duffle bag. Not that it’s a bio-hazard or anything, I just like the idea of making the thief work for his reward. But I wonder if the effort lost on the return trip. I wonder if the luggage is more meticulously ransacked upon arriving in Cuba, as opposed to leaving Cuba.

When packing to come home again, I’m usually somewhat disgruntled I wonder if the luggage is more meticulously ransacked upon arriving in Cuba, as opposed to leaving Cuba. Why assume things always go missing at the Cuban end? There have been a lot of instances of pretty well organized theft at Pearson, for example. I always figure there is more time for pilfering at the place you are departing from (luggage waiting 3+ hours to be loaded on the flight) rather than when things are being offloaded and put on a conveyor belt….considering the speed this seems to happen (most of the time!) I would assume there is less opportunity to go through bags and any obstacle to opening one (zip ties, whatever) may be sufficient to deter casual thieves.
martian Guest Barbudos,The zip ties cost pennies and work like a charm.

Leave a handful of them in an outside pocket, along with a cheap nail clipper or some other small blade to cut them off with (I’m too lazy to fool around releasing them with a pointy object) and no worries…

When packing to come home again, I’m usually somewhat disgruntled I wonder if the luggage is more meticulously ransacked upon arriving in Cuba, as opposed to leaving Cuba. Why assume things always go missing at the Cuban end? I suppose you could be right. It might be wrong of me to assume that these things go missing and into the pockets of Cubans rather than Canadians. But I’ve flown back and forth from Winnipeg, Calgary, Edmonton, etc., and I’ve never had half full bottles of sunscreen and shampoo go missing. I just can’t imagine the average Pearson employee wanting my half full tube of toothpaste.

Either way, I like the dirty underwear and socks treatment. I might have to save some for my next trip down, and then take advantage of the laundry service at the resort!

I suppose you could be right. It might be wrong of me to assume that these things go missing and into the pockets of Cubans rather than Canadians. But I’ve flown back and forth from Winnipeg, Calgary, Edmonton, etc., and I’ve never had half full bottles of sunscreen and shampoo go missing. I just can’t imagine the average Pearson employee wanting my half full tube of toothpaste. ;D ;D O.K. I’ll have to give you that one. I’d agree unlikely to be a target in Canada……but the more expensive items, now that’s another story. If pilfering is down to such a science that they can get it done as the bags are being unloaded, maybe it should be suggested as an Olympic event. Bottom line, use those zip ties! (so far nothing missing for me and DH with a cumulative Cuba trip total of over 30….are we just lucky, or maybe our stuff isn’t worth stealing?)

we have built in locks on our "hard " suitcases. not sure how much protection it offers, but we choose to use the locks.

I always lock with a little Samsonite combination lock. I’ve seen too many 20/20/Dateline reports of thefts at airports. It works as a deterrent. If anyone (Canadian or Cuban) wants to get into my luggage badly enough, I’ll gladly open it for them.

I never pack anything of value. The digital camera and I-Pod go in my carry-on.

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